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Alkcon Corporation has developed a patent-pending, energy efficient alkane conversion process that employs proprietary gas processing technology which can produce propane fuel from natural gas or other sources of methane.
Alkcon ProcessIn a dielectric barrier discharge (non-thermal plasma) reactor, methane gas is converted to ethane, propane and butane(s) in a gas phase, near atmospheric pressure. The ethane product from the first reactor is separated and is converted to propane in the second reactor in the presence of methane. Propane is separated from the product stream as a liquid, via simple compression, and blended with measured amounts of butane and an odorant, as required. Unreacted methane and excess hydrogen gas are separated and recycled.

Excess hydrogen can be utilized in an on-site fuel cell for auxiliary power or captured as an additional product stream for use in a FCEV.

Methane and waste gases can be consumed in a gas turbine generator to provide on-site electrical power for the system in remote locations.

Related Industry Papers and Reports

The Selective Production of Ethane by Dehydrogenative Methane Coupling through Dielectric-Barrier Discharge under Ordinary Pressure

Journal of Fuels (2014)
Kinetic Model of the Methane Conversion into Higher Hydrocarbons in a Dielectric Barrier Discharge
Chemical Engineering Journal (2013)
Fluid Modeling of the Conversion of Methane into Higher Hydrocarbons in an Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharge
Materials Science (2011)
Methane Conversion in Low-Temperature Plasma
High Energy Chemistry (2009)
Conversion of Methane through Dielectric-Barrier Discharge Plasma
Frontiers of Chemical Engineering in China (2008)
Dielectric-barrier Discharges: Their History, Discharge Physics, and Industrial Applications
Plasma Chemistry and Plasma Processing (2003)
Reaction Pathways of Methane Conversion in Dielectric-Barrier Discharge
Korean J. Chem. Eng. (2003)
Conversion of Methane to Higher Hydrocarbons in AC Nonequilibrium Plasmas
American Institute of Chemical Engineers (1998)